Election Legislation signed into law in 2014

Ohio-Senate Bills

Election Administration/Ballots/Candidates, Sub. SB 109, effective February 25, 2014

Sub.Senate Bill 109 puts in place changes to the administration of elections, including certain certifications, the use of ballots, and the testing of electronic poll books. Now signed into law, this legislation provides greater flexibility and cost savings to local elections boards.  Click here to read more.

Click here to read SB 109, as enacted.

Click here for the Final Bill analysis.

 

List Maintenance Bill, Am.Substitute SB 200, passed by the 130th Ohio General Assembly, effective March 20, 2014

This bill gives the Secretary of State administrative duties for the state voter registration database. The bill provides several provisions for the secretary of state to maintain voter rolls, including obtaining information from state agencies and entering agreements with other states to compare voter rolls.

Click here to read SB 200, as enacted.

Click here for SB 200 Bill Final Analysis

Click here for SB 200 Bill Briefing

Click here for SB 200 Sponsor Testimony

 

Absentee Voting Bill,Sub. SB 205, passed by the 130th Ohio General Assembly, effective June 1, 2014

This bill permits the Secretary of State to mail unsolicited applications for absent voter’s ballots only in even-numbered years and only if the General Assembly has made an appropriation for that purpose, among other provisions.

Click here to read SB 205, as enacted.

Click here for SB 205 Bill Final Analysis

Click here for SB 205 Bill Briefing

Click here for SB 205 Sponsor Testimony

 

Conduct of Elections/Provisional Ballot Bill, Substitute SB 216, passed by the 130th Ohio General Assembly, effective June 1, 2014

This bill permits the Board of Elections to provide a single voting location for more than one precinct of which a single presiding judge would oversee. The bill requires voters who do not have required ID under current state law to vote by provisional ballot, providing the driver’s license or state identification card number or last four digits of the voter’s Social Security number on the provisional ballot envelope or appear at the office of the board of elections not later than seven days after Election Day and provide required ID or the last four digits of the voter’s social security number. The Provisional Ballot Envelope was revised to include the voter’s current address and date of birth to help eliminate confusion being experienced in use of the envelope. Other changes include allowing a newly married woman to vote a regular ballot instead of a provisional if she can provide evidence of the name change; allowing a voter to find out if their provisional ballot was counted but not whether others counted; and rewriting the “right church, wrong pew” section to more accurately reflect the ruling of U.S. District Court Judge Algenon Marbley and Sec. Husted’s ensuing directive.

Click here to read SB 216, as enacted.

Click here for SB 216 Bill Analysis

 

Absentee Voting Bill,SB 238, Passed by the 130th General Assembly, effective June 1, 2014

This bill reduces the days for absentee voting from 35 days to either 28 or 29 days, (whichever applies to make the start of absentee voting begin the day after voter registration ends), effectively ending “golden week” during which citizens may register to vote and immediately cast an absentee ballot.

Click here to read the Final Analysis of SB 238, as enacted.

Click here to read SB 238, as enrolled

Click here to read “Golden Week Fix Passes Senate”

Click here for SB 238 Bill Briefing

Click here for SB 238 Bill Analysis

Click here for SB 238 Sponsor Testimony